Magnus Bane, High Warlock of Brooklyn, and Alexander Lightwood, Shadowhunter, are one of the most beautiful OTPs to ever exist. I will go down with this ship and sail it even in the afterlife. And the next life after. Malec forever. (But I will blog a lot of other TMI things and also lots of TID things, especially Jem things.)

 

Heronstairs

cassandraclare:

About Will and Jem…

Dear Cassie,

Thanks again for your response to my question about Tessa! I originally wrote this the day after Heronstairs day, but with CoHF and TBC, I know you’ve been super busy! 

I have a question regarding two big players in the Shadowhunter ‘verse: Will and Jem. Yesterday a lot of people were posting about them due to the date (November 10th) and it got me thinking.

How are we as readers meant to interpret their relationship? After CP2, you posted about the relationships between  Tessa, Will, and Jem and said “At no point do Will and Jem discuss their need for a chaperon, lest they give in to irresistible temptation and sully the senses out of each other.”

Online, however, there is a lot of discussion about it in terms of a relationship including romantic love. They are talked about as the third love story of TID, the third side of the triangle. 

Platonic friendship is wonderful and I think their relationship is great no matter what, but I also think there is something inherently different though about how something “could be canon. the evidence is there” with a queer vs hetero relationship. (Harry and Hermione are probably the biggest example I can think of this, with huge numbers of people viewing it as friendship and a very large number seeing romantic love. Their relationship is meant to be seen as friendship, more like family. They even spell it out in the last book!) It’s more of a representation issue. If Harry and Hermione don’t have those feelings, there are still plenty of other straight couples in HP.

So, as Will and Jem, are your creations, what are your thoughts on all of this? Are readers meant to understand that Jem and Will are bi of some sort (romantic and or sexual)? Is it part of the goals of writing about a not typically portrayed love triangle? Are the love interests of the protagonist queer? How would you define their relationship? 

-K

P.S. I really enjoy all of your posts regarding representation in fiction, as someone who isn’t straight.

 Hi! Thank you first for your kind words about my posts.

When you’re dealing with representation, and reader interpretation, you’re always dealing with tricky business. I incredibly appreciate the imagination of my readers. I also know my word is not the last word on what happens in my books: no book follows every moment in the lives of its characters. What happens in the liminal spaces — the time before Jem and Will met Tessa for instance — very much belongs to the reader.

I feel uncomfortable telling readers what they’re “meant to understand.” I want them to feel like their reads are valid. There are readings I disagree with (like that Will and Jem would have been better off if they’d never met Tessa, that Tessa doesn’t really love Will/doesn’t really love Jem, etc) but that doesn’t mean they’re not meaningful for the readers who interpret the story that way.

Jem and Will have an incredibly intense relationship. They also live in a time/place where friendships and relationships between men were romanticized, and were spoken of in incredibly romantic and flowery language. I think they often speak to and about each other in a way modern readers interpret as romantic because it sounds romantic. The Victorian Romantic Friendship Reader describes the era as a time when “when men could openly express an unashamed, unselfconscious, all-consuming love for members of their own sex.” Tennyson, as far as we know (okay, there’s some debate) was straight, but wrote a long elegy on the death of his friend Arthur Hallam in which he calls him “all I love,” “him I loved, and love / For ever,” and “my lost desire.” (The poem is “In Memoriam”, which shows up a lot, not coincidentally, in Clockwork Princess.)

Will and Jem definitely have a romantic friendship, and I do think the love triangle is a true triangle in the sense that Jem and Tessa love each other, Will and Tessa love each other, and Will and Jem love each other. Is their love canonically a sexual love? Here is where this is is a tricky issue because these are two distinct moral goods at play here.

 It’s very important to me that I not be given credit for representation that is not explicit in my books. I believe we are at a time when books can show characters who are not heterosexual, and those books can be published (though of course there are still many obstacles for diverse books and pressure on creators not to create diverse works, which makes it even more clear that we have a responsibility to do so.) Therefore queer coding, or later saying “Of course So-and-So was an LGBTQ character, or of course there are LGBTQ characters in my work but we never heard about them in the work and they never had any relationships and nothing would clue you in on their identity…” is not sufficient. There are gay couples in the Shadowhunters ‘verse where their sexuality is explicit on the page: there is no question with Magnus and Woolsey that they are bi and gay; there is no question in TMI about Alec and Magnus, or Aline and Helen, or any question in the Bane Chronicles that Magnus is bisexual and in relationships with men and women. That’s part of why I, along with Maureen and Sarah, wanted to write the Bane Chronicles so much—to have Magnus front and center. He deserves to be, and LGBTQ readers deserve such a protagonist. But I also think they deserve better than queer coding and hints at sexuality that isn’t hetero — that stuff should be on the page, and if it isn’t — if it’s your “headcanon” as a writer — then that’s great, but that isn’t per se representation.

 That said, I strongly believe readers should have the freedom to interpret works as they will, without a creator looking over their shoulders: There are liminal spaces in my books which are designed for readers’ imaginations to fill in. No two readers ever read quite the same book. I don’t want to take away any possible interpretations from readers: it would feel like robbing them of enjoyment I believe they should have and depriving my work of some layers. The author’s dead, and to an extent I want to be considered dead—as long as nobody comes and pops me off this mortal coil when I’m eating a yoghurt so they can enjoy my books more. I don’t ever want to get in the way of my readers enjoying my work the way they want to. 

So I hope you understand when I say: I can’t entirely answer that question. Do I mind Heronstairs? Not at all. I am totally 100% behind those who ship it. (Ship and let ship, I say.) Do I think Heronstairs makes total sense within the framework of the narrative of Infernal Devices? Yes, it does. Nothing contradicts it. Do I think Will and Jem are bisexual representation? No, and I shouldn’t get any credit for them being so. Does that mean they’re not bi? No. Does that mean they are bi? No. It means you get to decide now.

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(Hopefully we can all agree they are adorable?)

cassandraclare:

#TMITuesdays 
For fun, one of Cassandra Jean’s postcards of scenes from City of Heavenly Fire. Above, Raphael, Magnus and Luke.
You can see the last postcard here.

cassandraclare:

#TMITuesdays 

For fun, one of Cassandra Jean’s postcards of scenes from City of Heavenly Fire. Above, Raphael, Magnus and Luke.

You can see the last postcard here.

41 DAYS!!!

fuckyeahmalec:

Can we just talk about how THERES ON,Y 41 days left until we find out who does, if our ship stops sinking, and we get to meet MAGNUS’s FATHER!!!!!

"You’re not Will"

cassandraclare:

Hi, Cassie! So, it has been more than a year since the release of CP2 and I still didn’t get over it. I feel both happy and depressed when I think about this series. And I know that we will still see the characters in TLH, but it will not be the same, because it will be in their children points of view. So, I was wondering… you have written many extra scenes for TMI, and scenes from different characters POVs (like Jace’s, when it was Clary’s POV in the book). Are you planning on sharing with us any more scenes like that from TID? I wouldn’t mind at all a POV of Jem’s, specially that scene from the CP2 epilogue ♥ Thank you so much, and I’m super excited for CoHF and your coming to Brazil! — fairchild-gray-fray

I’ve never written the scene on the bridge from Jem’s point of view because Jem knows way too much about what happens in City of Heavenly Fire. It would, bizarrely, be spoilery for TMI. So maybe TMI is done; we’ll see. 

If you want to read Jem’s POV on the bedroom scene with Tessa in Clockwork Prince, though, I wrote that. It’s called An Offering of Moonlight. I’ll paste it in, though many of you may have read it before — it’s not new. Under the cut, from the chapter “Fierce Midnight” in CP. There’s also “Burning Bright" which is Jem’s perspective on meeting Tessa for the first time.*

*And now  I noticed the first thing Jem ever says to Tessa is “You’re not Will.” Huh.

** Ooh, Cassandra Jean gave me a Jessa scrap the other day. Now I get to use my scrap!

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Read More

910707:

910707:

"Alec was not like any Shadowhunter Magnus had met before"

90% of these words were said by Magnus anyway

I feel the need to reblog this gifset because I heard someone said Alec has “no personalities” LOL

omgjustkissalready:

plot twist: alec calls the talent agency and becomes a famous actor. screw war and shit i’m a movie star bitches. 

What ifs

cassandraclare:

tw: suicide

What would have happened to Jem and Will if Tessa had never come into their lives? —(composited question)

Jem would have died from the yin fen. Will would have committed suicide, ending the Herondale line.